Coal Miner Black Lung Benefit Tee


As you might already know we have dedicated our denim inspiration to some of America's grittiest and toughest workers, the Coal Miners. We felt like it was important to give back to the people we have admired and dedicated so much of our inspiration to so we found the Appalachian Citizens Law Center as a very worthy  charity who legally represents American Coal Miners in cases of Black Lung and other miner related problems or issues.

Here is their mission statement. "The Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center is a nonprofit law firm that fights for justice in the coalfields by representing coal miners and their families on issues of black lung and mine safety and by working with grassroots groups and individuals to protect the land and people from misuse and degradation caused by extractive industries. The Center handles individual cases and engages in strategic litigation and policy work in the areas of mine safety and health, environmental protection, legacy costs of extractive industries on the people, land and economy of the Central Appalachian region, and sustainable energy." We will be donating all profits made from the sales of this tee towards their cause. Here is a link   to directly donate if you prefer that method or would like to visit their website for more information. https://aclc.org/  Charity Navigator has given them a score of 94/100 and was supported by the famous folk singer John Prine. 

Sorry for the verbose description but this describes the tee shirt design. This is a Coffin Note from the Molly Maguire's.  They were a secret Irish Labor Union that came over in the 1800's from Ireland before there was the UMWA. They defended the rights of Coal Miners in Eastern Pennsylvania by any means necessary. They were a huge inspiration to me when designing the denim and Work Uniform as well as to all Working men and woman in America. This note was given to mine bosses as a threat for poor working conditions of miners as well as low pay, and other abuses Coal Miners had to sucomb to working in jobs that had little to no protection from any agency or government. The Molly Maguire's were eventually investigated by the Pinkerton Detective Agency, who were hired by the mine to infiltrate and Prosecute them.  On June 21, 1879 after a quick and unfair trial 20 of the Molly Maguire's were sentenced to death and 10 hung that day in Jim Thorpe Pennsylvania known as Black Thursday. In 1979, more than 100 years following his hanging, John Kehoe—the supposed “king” of the Molly Maguire's—was granted a full pardon by the state of Pennsylvania.

We thank you for your concern for the right of American Coal Miners and your contribution to their causes and protection. 


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